New River State Park

New River State Park TRACK Trail map

The New River State Park TRACK Trail was superimposed upon the Park’s Hickory Trail. The Hickory Trail begins on the side of the visitor center (left side if facing the front) and continues as a 1.0-mile long loop trail that has a short out-and-back spur that will deliver you to the edge of the New River. The trail passes through an oak-hickory montane forest, down to the river’s edge, up through a mountain meadow and back to the visitor center through a pine thicket. To get your TRACK Trail adventures, please visit the trailhead kiosk located just outside the entrance of the Park’s Visitor Center. While there, be sure to visit the museum to learn more about the history of New River.

Rugged hillsides, pastoral meadows and farmlands surround what is believed to be one of the oldest rivers in North America – the New River. Its waters are slow and placid. Its banks are fertile and covered with wildflowers. Dedicated as a National Scenic River in 1976, this gentle river is the centerpiece of New River State Park.


The New River area still maintains an old-fashioned charm. Mountain roads are narrow and winding, dotted with small farms, churches and country stores. The river itself is tranquil, offering good bass fishing, trout streams, excellent birding and inspiring mountain scenery. But perhaps the best way to absorb and appreciate the river’s peacefulness is from the seat of a canoe as it glides across the slow-moving waters. Four areas with river access to this waterway make up more than 2,200 acres of New River State Park and provide spots for camping, canoeing, picnicking and fishing.

Track an adventure here
New River State Park TRACK Trail sticker

Location Details

Recreational Features: Canoe / Kayak, Camping, Picnic Tables, Fishing, Birding, Playground
Amenities: Restrooms, Nature Center, Visitor Center, Gift Shop
ADA Compliant: No
Seasonality: Open all year
New River State Park TRACK Trail in the woods
Tree on the trail with mushrooms growing on it
The New River
New River State Park TRACK Trail in the woods
Ribbon cutting ceremony for the New River State Park TRACK Trail
The New River
Rolling hillside with trees in the back ground
New River State Park Visitor's Center and Kids in Parks kiosk

Adventures for New River State Park

New River: Animal Athletes - Critter Cardio for Kids brochure
Hiking

New River: Animal Athletes - Critter Cardio for Kids

Difficulty:
Easy
Trail length:
1.30
Wild animals are some of the world’s greatest athletes, able to perform amazing physical feats. Are you ready to exercise with the animals of New River State Park? This brochure will show you how different animals move and guide you through eight exercises you can do as you hike the Hickory Trail.
New River: Flowers become Fruit brochure
Hiking

New River: Flowers become Fruit

Difficulty:
Easy
Trail length:
1.30
Did you know that every flower can become a fruit… and every fruit was once a flower? The Flowers Become Fruit brochure was designed to help you learn about some of the flower / fruit combinations that can be found in the Blue Ridge Mountains. It also provides a diagram to help you learn about flower parts and their functions.
New River: Nature's Hide & Seek brochure
Hiking

New River: Nature's Hide & Seek

Difficulty:
Easy
Trail length:
1.30
The Nature's Hide & Seek brochure is designed so that kids of all ages can walk along the trail and discover common things that are often overlooked in nature. Some of them are hard to find, others are easy. Best of all, the adventure never ends because every time you walk the trail you will discover new things hiding in nature.
New River: Nature's Hide & Seek Spring Edition brochure
Hiking

New River: Nature's Hide & Seek Spring Edition

Difficulty:
Easy
Trail length:
1.30
The Nature's Hide & Seek: Spring Edition brochure is similar to our original Nature's Hide and Seek brochure led adventure except that the items you are looking for are wildflowers and other common things that can be found in the Blue Ridge Mountains each spring. Some of them are hard to find, others are easy; but, best of all the adventure never ends because every time you walk the trail you will discover new things hiding in nature.
New River: Nature's Relationships - Everything's Connected brochure
Hiking

New River: Nature's Relationships - Everything's Connected

Difficulty:
Easy
Trail length:
1.30
In the Nature's Relationships brochure you will discover how everything in nature is connected... even us. As you walk along the trail, the brochure will tell you a story about a few of the relationships that can be found. Many more relationships exist, so keep your eyes and heart open and you will discover many of nature's relationships – even yours.
New River: Tree Tales brochure
Hiking

New River: Tree Tales

Difficulty:
Easy
Trail length:
1.30
Have you ever come across a tree with an odd shape or strange markings on the bark, and wondered how it got that way? If you study a tree closely, you might find that it has an interesting story to tell. Our Tree Tales brochure will guide you to several of the unique trees along the Park’s Hickory Trail and give you examples of how living and nonliving factors can affect trees.

Directions

162 Highway 221
Crumpler, NC 28617
Latitude: 36.451659000000
Longitude: -81.390479400000

From Boone
Travel Hwy 421 S (toward Winston-Salem) for ~10 miles and turn Left onto US Highway 221 N. After driving through Jefferson (~16 miles), turn Left onto US 221/16 N. Travel north approximately 1.3 miles. Turn Right onto Hwy 221. Drive 7.1 miles to park entrance on the Right.

From the Blue Ridge Parkway
Exit the Blue Ridge Parkway at Milepost 230 near Roaring Gap onto Hwy 21 N (towards Savanna Ln). Stay on 21 N for 10 miles. Continue straight on US-221 S for approximately 13.5 miles to Park entrance on the Left.

From Other Locations
http://www.ncparks.gov/Visit/parks/neri/directions.php

GPS Directions
162 Highway 221 Access Road Crumpler, North Carolina 28617

Partners

The TRACK Trail program is sponsored by the Blue Ridge Parkway Foundation, the Blue Ridge Parkway, and the Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina Foundation.

The New River State Park’s TRACK Trail was made possible through partnerships formed with Be Active AppalachianNorth Carolina State Parks with grant funds provided by the Health Resources and Services Administration as part of a larger Appalachian-Ashe Prevention Partners project.